Dog Feeding Schedule

Posted on November 09, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

Dogs thrive on routine. They LIVE for it! A typical daily routine for your pup usually includes eating, sleeping, and playing. Pretty great isn’t it?! Sleeping and playing are pretty straightforward, but a feeding schedule is something that has a few variables.


Typically, adult dogs are fed twice daily; once in the morning and once at dinner time. This usually correlates with most people’s work schedules and keeps an adult dog full throughout the day.


If you are the lucky one to be bringing a puppy home – congrats! Since puppies’ metabolisms are much higher than an adult dog and they have LOTS of growing to do, it is ideal for them to be fed 3x daily. In the morning, afternoon and dinnertime. With a working family, some choose to feed in the morning, after they get home from work, and closer to bedtime. This way their nutrients are split evenly throughout the day. (This is also a great way to feed a highly active dog as well!)


Some dogs aren’t big eaters and will pick at a bowl of food throughout the day. This is fine as long as their daily amount is measured out each day and the food is changed frequently to avoid it getting stale.


Meal feeding is helpful for digestion. The key here is that your dog’s DAILY amount of food DOES NOT change, it just is split into however many meals they will need. Lastly, be sure to provide fresh water at all times for your furry friend!

Posted in Helpful Tips

Beat the Heat!

Posted on July 13, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

This summer has been throwing us some serious heat waves and everyone’s feeling it.

Your dog is no different, and if anything, is even more susceptible to the effects of the hot sun.


Could you imagine wearing a winter coat all summer?! Dogs also can’t sweat like people do to reduce body temperature. They have sweat pads on their feet, but otherwise, they use panting as a way to let heat evaporate through their tongues.


Here are some tips to help keep your pup cool so you both can have fun in the sun!

  • Bring along a collapsible water dish and water so your dog can have a drink wherever you go. It is SO important for dogs to stay hydrated, just like people.
  • Offer an ice pack or damp towel for them to lie down on to reduce body temperature.
  • Replace some of their kibble with canned food: Canned food contains more water than kibble, so this will help them to stay hydrated.
  • Stay close to shade or bring a sun shade so there is a way out of the direct sun.
  • Avoid hot pavement. It would burn your bare feet to walk on hot pavement and it’s the same for dog’s sensitive pads. Use booties to prevent any heat burns if you have to be on the roads.
  • Limit exercise: Going for walks is fine, but if it’s blistering hot out, don’t go for long runs, agility training, etc.

*If you have a brachycephalic dog (short-faced dog), try and keep them out of the heat altogether. These dogs have an increased risk of breathing issues on a regular day, so a short walk on a hot day can be detrimental. Lying around in the A/C is best for these squishy pups.

Posted in Helpful Tips, Raising Awareness

Tips On Leash Training Your Dog

Posted on June 15, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

The city is a busy place, and if you live in an apartment or condo you likely will be going for a lot of walks with your dog. 🐕🏙️

All that hustle and bustle can be distracting for your pup and can cause your walks to be wrought with leash pulling. Teaching your dog how to properly walk on a leash is something that will benefit you (and your arm), your dog, and the people around you.


Here are some tips to help teach your dog to have good leash manners on those busy streets:


  1. Start before it all begins. If you expect your dog to walk controlled on a leash, they need to be in that state beforehand. If your dog is bouncing around, doing circles and jumping at the door, there’s less of a chance that they will be able to calm down when that leash is clipped on. Stand still with your leash at your side until they have all four feet on the floor. Don’t clip the leash until they have calmed down and can stand in front of you. Don’t open the door until this happens either.
  2. Choose what method works for you AND your dog: there are many methods of leash training out there: some are reward based and some are more disciplinary. Do your research and find what fits your duo.
  3. Utilize head halters. Products such as gentle leaders are a fabulous tool to help your dog learn to walk on a leash. It utilizes pressure points on the head and nose to reduce pulling and is something that your dog can easily get used to and is great for dogs that can’t have pressure on their throats for medical reasons. You DO need to do some training with these products though for them to be effective.
  4. DON’T make your leash training your dog’s main source of exercise. These sessions should be short and concise to keep your dogs attention. It doesn’t give your dog enough time to release their energy (which is what we DON’T want on a leash walk), so make sure to set aside a separate time for off-leash play/running/etc. This will also help your dog relax on their leash walks since they don’t have excess built up energy.
  5. Walk at a quick pace. Going for a brisk walk with your dog will decrease the chance of them catching a whiff of a delicious smell or getting distracted by something. It also reduces the likelihood of them wanting to stop and eliminate on everything in sight!

Keep training fun!

Your dog thrives on interaction with you and this is a great opportunity to bond and learn something new together. If you get frustrated or things just aren’t going great one day, take a break and try again another time. ❤️

Posted in Helpful Tips

Potty Training Your Pup In the City

Posted on May 04, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

The joy of getting a new puppy is one that we should all experience. How could you NOT love those squishable rolls and puppy breath?! But, puppies really are like babies. They need CONSTANT attention and unfortunately, the downfall with a puppy instead of a baby is that you can’t put a diaper on it (well you could, but you may get more than a few odd looks from others).

Potty training a puppy is something we all dread, and to make matters worse, living in the city means that most people don’t have an accessible yard.


How are you going to do it?! You have to get over the obstacles of having to know when your dog needs to go, race them down the elevator, through the lobby and outside, hopefully to find a minuscule patch of grass.


The trick is TIMING IS EVERYTHING. In the beginning, you can start out by training on pee pads, or splurge on a lovely piece of “fake grass” for your balcony. This trick often works for small dogs as we can all imagine, their “business” is just as small as they are and easy to clean.


If you’re a large dog lover though, this isn’t the most practical method. When they are little it is acceptable to pee pad train IN CONJUNCTION with training to go outside. But as they grow, you won’t want those giant messes in your building.


Start tracking your puppies habits. Get a journal and write down when they usually eat, drink, play and need to go out (or have accidents). This will give you a decent timeline of when you should try and take them out.


Most puppies need to go to the bathroom shortly after eating, drinking, and sleeping so those are good times to take them down to the streets. Some dogs will need training to go on concrete, and others grass if you have it nearby. Take them to your ideal spot and give command words such as “Go pee!” or “Do your business!”. When they do go, give LOTS of praise and training treats to reward the positive behaviour.

Try and catch them before they start whining when they are indoors. Usually, by the time you pack them up and try and get them out, it’s too late. As your puppy gets older you can start spacing out the time between walks as their bladders will become stronger. An adult dog though will still need a walk to go to the bathroom at least 3-4 times a day. Plenty of exercise for the both of you!


Bullwrinkles Tenderchips or Liver Lovers are a great option to use as training treats. They are easily broken into small pieces which is great for having to give multiple treats throughout the day. They also smell AMAZING (to dogs of course).


As a tip, don’t end your walk right after your pup has done their business. If you do this, they may start to hold their bladders and bowels to get more walk time in. Tricky!

Posted in Helpful Tips

Spring is here! Time for some spring cleaning for your pets!

Posted on April 06, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments



Spring is making its appearance and it’s time to start thinking about “Spring Cleaning." Not just your house, but your pets as well!


Grooming your dog is an important part of pet wellness. Whether you have a short or long-haired furry friend they all need some sort of maintenance. With this warm weather coming, it’s the perfect time to trim things up and brush things out!


Short Haired Dogs:


Fairly low maintenance, but these dogs still have dander and shed those small, prickly hairs. Give them a good conditioning bath, and brush them out with a rubber curry comb or shedding blade to help to loosen up any dead hair and skin left behind by the dry winter air. Trimming nails and making sure their ears are clean is also an important part of general grooming as well for all pets.


Medium/Long Haired Dogs:

These dogs are a bit more work when it comes to their coat, and it will differ between breeds on how much maintenance they will need. Springtime is usually when most dogs start a big shed and so getting them to a groomer for a thorough bath and cut is essential in keeping those hairy tumbleweeds at bay. Giving your dog that much-needed haircut will also help to keep them cool in the warmer weather and reduce the likelihood of mats and tangles that tend to happen from outdoor activities in the spring and summer.

Posted in Helpful Tips

Fact Friday!

Posted on January 19, 2018 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

The best way to make sure your pet is at their ideal weight is not by actually weighing them, but by their Body Condition Score!

A Body Condition Score (BCS) chart lays out specific guidelines to help pet owners and professionals have a hands-on assessment of fat and muscle mass. It is either scored 1-5 or 1-9 depending on what chart you use.

Click the link below to take a look at a BCS chart and figure out where your pet stands!

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Posted in Fun Fact, Helpful Tips, Raising Awareness

Holiday Hazards

Posted on December 12, 2017 by Chelsea Smales | 0 comments

Pets are family members, and many people want to include them in the holiday festivities. 🎄

Here are a few things you should know to keep your pet safe, and everyone happy during this time of year:

 

Oh, Christmas Tree! 

  • Decorations on a Christmas tree attract the eyes of everyone, including your four-legged friend. It may be tempting for them to take a closer look, so make sure your tree is anchored securely to avoid any falling hazards.

 Mistletoe and Holly

  • These classic holiday plants may make you want to get up close and personal, but to a dog, if ingested, can cause a severe upset stomach. This includes vomiting and diarrhea; something that neither your pooch or you want during the holiday season.

 Making Spirits Bright

  • Christmas time just isn’t the same without the wondrous glow of Christmas lights. Whether they are inside or out, be sure to keep all wires tucked away and out of reach of your pet.

If chewed on, wires can give a nasty electrical shock and leave burns in their sensitive mouths and esophagus. Your pet can also get tangled in the wires, and cause injury to their limbs and other body parts.

 Sweets and Meats

  • What are the holidays without copious amounts of food?! While eating large amounts of chocolate and turkey only affect our waistline, to a dog it can be very dangerous.

Chocolate and sweets with xylitol can be toxic to dogs. Usually causing some gastrointestinal upset, but it can also cause neurological impairment and can be fatal.

High-fat meats and other fixings can have an effect on your pooch’s digestive system, causing GI upset, and can lead to an inflamed pancreas. This can leave you with costly medical bills and one sick puppy.

 

If you follow these tips and keep your pet safe this holiday, it means everyone can enjoy this magical time of year!

 

Posted in Helpful Tips, Raising Awareness

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